Juan antonio criminal record harris county


Court of Appeals of Texas, Houston (14th Dist.).

More Information

Houston Police Jose Gilberto Rodriguez. Rodriguez is accused in the shooting deaths of two women and a man, identified as Allie Barrow, Pamela Johnson and Edward Magana. Jose Gilberto Rodriguez. Jose Gilberto Rodriguez is accused of a crime spree in the Houston and Harris County, Texas, area that spanned several days and included home invasions, a street robbery and two fatal shootings at mattress stores.

No one was injured during that incident. On Friday, July 13, a year-old woman was found dead in her home following a home invasion. Police have identified her as Pamela Johnson. She was found by another employee. The car was found Saturday in the mall parking lot.

Jose Gilberto Rodriguez: 5 Fast Facts You Need to Know

On Monday, July 16, police said a year-old bus driver was shot during an apparent attempted robbery in the Frenchtown area of Houston. The shooting happened about a. His condition was not immediately known Tuesday, but he is expected to survive. The next shooting occurred about p. Magana was a father of four from El Salvador, his son told the news station.

We are fully cooperating with all law enforcement to quickly bring justice to this matter. Out of respect for the team member, his family and the law enforcement investigation we will refrain from commenting further at this time. Johnson, who was killed in her home, worked for several years at a Kroger store.

STRATO - Domain not available

She was a widow who struggled with severe hearing issues, but was beloved in her neighborhood. A vigil was held on Sunday after her death was made public. Nicest woman. Outside doing Bible study on her driveway at least two to three times a day. Barrow was a native of Terrell, Texas, and had worked at Mattress Firm since , according to her Facebook page. It shows six young Latino men staring blankly ahead. But according to judges and experts, this lineup is deeply prejudicial.

Two small details — the black hoodie Balderas is wearing and the mark on his left cheek — may have singled him out to the witness who viewed this lineup. Combined with allegations that prosecutors hid evidence from the defense during the trial, and that another witness has recanted his account of the shooting, the identification raises the troubling question of whether Balderas was wrongfully convicted. Meanwhile, a panel of experts formed to cut down on wrongful convictions is urging state legislators to beef up rules for witness identifications.

O n December 6, , year-old Eduardo Hernandez was hanging out with friends at an apartment in Alief, a suburb in sprawling southwest Houston. A man in a black hoodie barged in, circled the room, and shot Hernandez nine times in the back and head. Hernandez was part of a local street gang called La Tercera Crips. He had angered his fellow members by snitching and throwing hand signs for a rival gang, several would later testify.

She described the shooter as someone she had never seen before, a young Latino man about 5 feet 6 inches tall, skinny and clean-shaven. He had short black hair in a fade haircut and was wearing a black hoodie. And he had a dark mark on his cheek, she said.

Over the next few days, Houston police received anonymous tips suggesting that Balderas, another member of the gang, was involved. The week after the murder, an officer went back to Wendy with a new lineup of six photos, which the Observer obtained through a Texas Public Information Act request. Wendy recognized Balderas — the two had lived in the same apartment complex and had known each other for about a year.

The first problem is the lineup itself. It includes only one person — Balderas — who matches the description Wendy gave police. None of the other five men are wearing a black hoodie or have any marks on their faces. The process is also an issue.

Harris County sued for civil rights violations following deadly jail confrontation

Research over the past few years has made clear that even small, unintentionally leading statements by officers can make witnesses feel pressured to choose someone. Coaching, such as when the officer urged Wendy to cover parts of the faces, can do the same.

Juan Antonio Pena v. The State of Texas--Appeal from 177th District Court of Harris County

Code Crim. Such a limitation is designed to protect individuals from having to defend themselves against charges when the basic facts may have become obscured by the passage of time and to minimize the danger of official punishment because of acts in the far-distant past. Such a time limit may also have the salutary effect of encouraging law enforcement officials promptly to investigate suspected criminal activity. See State v. United States , U.

Right to a speedy trial? Ask these defendants

In many of these cases, the person accused of failing to appear will show that they did not receive notice of the court date. The courts have held that proof that the accused was free under an instanter bond is prima facie proof of notice to appear. See Solomon v.

juan antonio criminal record harris county Juan antonio criminal record harris county
juan antonio criminal record harris county Juan antonio criminal record harris county
juan antonio criminal record harris county Juan antonio criminal record harris county
juan antonio criminal record harris county Juan antonio criminal record harris county
juan antonio criminal record harris county Juan antonio criminal record harris county
juan antonio criminal record harris county Juan antonio criminal record harris county
juan antonio criminal record harris county Juan antonio criminal record harris county

Related juan antonio criminal record harris county



Copyright 2019 - All Right Reserved